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of several historical novels he spoke for a little more than an hour in jackson, mississippi. >> the reason for me to be in jackson maybe more so than any other is what took place 40 miles west of here and that is what i want to talk about tonight. at vicksburg, so this is quite a story and even some people around here don't know it. that is great fun for me but i need to start out talking about something that i always mention whenever i'm doing any event like this. i am quite sure that at least some of you have some interest in the civil war for one reason, because at of some time many years ago perhaps you read a book called the killer angels. every time i say that i see people nod their heads. you have no idea what the killer angels is that's okay. it's not required. i'll explain it to you quickly. the killer angels was written by my father and came out in 1974. it is the story of the battle of gettysburg. now with the killer angels is not is the history of the battle of gettysburg. it's not a history book. it's the story as told to you from the characters themselves and not just any cha
of this great tabloid from england and you will see this is his common-law wife a and then "mississippi burning" because wait until you hear how scarpa senior saul's the "mississippi burning" case. scarpa sr. had various nicknames, the killing machine, he thought he had a license to kill and he would sign the notes killing machine they called him career reaper, the mad hatter, hannibal lector because he was stopped counting after 50 birder's that makes him the most prolific killer pardon to stop counting and makes the wood of the top serial killers of all time he only did 30 years -- 30 days out of 30 years in prison he was a topic for mint his memos went directly to j. edgar hoover himself. three separate crime organized strike force in chicago, a brooklyn tried to put him away in the justice department tried to get this mad killer of history and other members of the fbi who are protecting him to keep them on the street. these are couple of homicides in the upper left corner he shot him while he was stringing christmas tree lights with his wife at his house. nicky was sitting in his toyota whe
. and then mississippi burning. wait until you hear hal scarpa senior is the gatt this of the mississippi burning portrayed in that movie which they happen. scarpa see at various nicknames. they call them the killing machine. he reveled in this. he felt that he had a license to kill. he would sign notes cayenne, killing machine. they called him the grim reaper, hannibal lector, the mad hatter. he had various names. he stopped counting after 50 murders, which makes him the most prolific killer in the history of cosa nostra, bar none and it makes him one of the top zero colors of all time, by the way. anyway, he only did 30 days in 30 years in prison. why? because from 1962 forward he was the top echelon criminal informants for the fbi. his briefing memos went directly to j. edgar hoover himself. over the years three separate organized crime strike forces, one in newark, one in chicago, one in brooklyn tried to put them away. could people are trying to get this mad dog killer of the street. other members of the fbi you are protecting him and keeping it on the street. these are a couple of the homic
in mississippi. there was a fear that somebody would get the idea the connecticut of the players. because in some ways these players were civil rights workers. in so most of the players, including the rights players, did not deal very much with the community at large. there really didn't. there were there to play ball. there were not big thinkers. maybe one of them once. >> did you happen to see the jackie robinson from an 42? >> i like to the lot, and i would probably be the most cynical of all. >> i was curious about it because he said the manager brought these guys and because it was a financial decision, a business decision. that was the same theme from 42. analysts is curious about the. seventeen years had passed. was is still a financial thing really or was it just -- >> row, what he said it was -- he had been dead for 20 years, so i did not get to interview him. he did not need the money personally. he was more of the richest as in town. he made in the timber industry. i don't think personally it would be doing something that was right. he loved baseball. a but being a baseball player at t
of mississippi where races suffocating part of everyday life. cory's version of the best was yet no idea these were police. he shot and fired one of these figures to protect himself and his daughter and as soon as he realized, surrendered in chapters 10 to three bullets left in the gun. the states version was cory the out the window and saw a team of police is coming at him, that he decided to take them on with a handgun that he shot and killed one of them and surrendered with the listen again. decide which of those those in areas hit by more plausible. basically he had a roach in his house that would lend him a $50 fine. he was charged and convicted of capital murder and sentenced to death. i was scared to the legal stuff that happened in between. eventually a couple years ago from his conviction was overturned by the mississippi supreme court. the prosecutors decided they would allow him to plead with manslaughter and he would get time served. at this point in prison for 10 years. at his homecoming party in mississippi, taking kids out for rides on his four wheeler and everybody's happ
in mississippi. and i think part of it was that these young idealistic college students wanted to understand these people, not as abstractions, not as enemies, not as human beings and that's exactly why -- what agee accomplishes but the other thing they were drawn to was that it showed them how to live without armor. it showed them how to live according to the principles without compromise. i teach "let us now praise famous men," or try to do my freshman and they hate it. i don't care. [laughter] because there are a couple of every semester t who did it and it's worth it but it's worth it. and "let us now praise famous men," as many of yo you know, is a book that you can't get past the first few pages or it changes your life. and i think in the early '60s there were people who wanted to change, who were eager for the change. and "let us now praise famous men" really spoke to that. >> is it true, agee's reputation as you say, the book itself is a commercial and more or less political flaw but he did live in new york and he had friends, and some of them talked to them. irving howe, paul goodma
kinds of other stuff happening in the summer. the great mississippi flood. the biggest natural disaster in american history. and you had al capone beginning -- the beginning of the end of al capone, and the end of prohibition. the information that it was coming to an end. you had the -- building mt. rushmoore, and coolidge announced he did not run for re-election. for reasons that are still slightly mystifying. henry ford had a madid -- a madid to build a city. so this book came not just looking at these two figures, baby ruth and lindbergh but looking at everything that was happening. it was kind of frenetic amount of activity, a great deal hoff changed the world, changed the way we perceived popular entertainment and so on. so it was constance general shall and always interesting and lively. >> host: any reason all these events happened in the summer of 1927? >> guest: they just happened in the summer of 1927. that is what kind of interesting about it. sometimes these things just happen and all of these happened then. by and large there wasn't any particular reason. they weren't there
twain. would come from? before he came to nevada territory he worked on the mississippi, and he became a steamboat captain. and the term mark twain is two fathoms, deep. it was from the water, the draft of a steamboat and they would say, mark twain. welcome he liked that apparently came you. this is the story that is generally accepted. there's another story about him having a tab at the bar and if you ask me, mark twain, mark two, put that on my tab. i think the generally accepted point of view from scholars is mark twain from being a steamboat captain. so here he is, writing for the enterprise, first time he put mark twain. it's published february 3. from then on, he is mark twain. and is stock would grow as his stores would be picked a. a newspaper in aurora woodpecker that the a newspaper in sacramento would pick it up to newspaper in san francisco. mostly in the western united states through the use of the telegraph. and very funny, although he says some things that they don't know if it's the truth or not. are the hoaxes? he has one story about a family, not far from carson city
down the mississippi filled with bales of hay for grant's horses. the barge set out at night, so the confederates wouldn't see it. but, unfortunately, it was a night with a full moon, and it was really quite visible, and the confederates fired cannons at it. one of the shells hit the barge, exploded, killed about a dozen union soldiers, set the hay on fire, and junius and albert jumped into the river and attempted to float away. but the confederates sut boats and captu th and imprisoned them in various prisons for the next 20 months. and then they escaped from a prison in salisbury, north carolina, and with the help of slaves and pro-union bush whackers walked 300 miles over the appalachians to the union lines. so i read this, which was only about as long as what i've just said, and i thought to myself, wow, that would make a great movie. unfortunately, i don't make movies. but occasionally i do write books. so i thought, well, should i write a book about these guys? i suppose if i was a novelist, that little synopsis would have been enough, and i just could have made up the rest
to the united states in 1848. he found that living on the mississippi was not quite the life that mark twain for trade in his book. together the dangberg brothers went to work together in a flour mill and then they moved to illinois where they were, from for threeyein 1853 hearing on tt stories about the gold rush and california, they decided to make the move west. they did this by buying 200 head of livestock and driving them from st. louis to california. it turns out that could be a very profitable venture. because even back then things are more expensive in california than they were in st. louis. you could buy a cow or an ox for five or $10 in st. louis. same animal would cost $50 or more in california. it was a profitable trip for them. they arrived in dayton, nevada, in 1853, they immediately went to work panning for gold in the carson river the next day. they did this for about three years, operating with mixed results. some days were exhausting, some is not so much. he did that for three winters. one of the letters that we recovered, he said that he gave up gold-mining because there w
antecedence in the first black boy who was assassinated in mississippi in 1955 for allegedly violating racial adequate and speaking to a white woman. her body was placed in the tallahassee river with the 25 -- nugent. it was shown in jet magazine and that spurred the nation to look at the price of white supremacy on our democracy. when you think about 1963, 1963 is the year of birmingham and the year dr. king writes his famous letter from a birmingham jail and in that letter dr. king said the activism going on in birmingham and the young women and men being arrested sometimes as young as 8, 9, 10 years old are taking this nation back to those great wells of democracy dug deep by the founding fathers. king was being kind because the country was founded on racial slavery. a conversation that we still have not had but 50 years ago with the march on washington provided, a litmus test for american democracy. when canes speaks at the march on washington on august 28, 1963, he says americans of all colors and all races are going to have to struggle together, go to jail together to try to fundamental
shelton was up for it. this was a guy who was born in mississippi. he grew up on a farm in a cotton. he had a lot of different jobs through his life. he was tough as nails and he joined the military when he was 18 years old. he joined as a private and went to korea and saw action right away. he was wounded three times, won the silver star. he came back and decided i love the military. i'm going to make this my career. the only time he left the military was back just before you got married. he decided he was going to try farming again. the military had a policy that you can leave the military for 90 days and returned -- if you return within 90 days you would get your previous rank but after 90 days you have to go back to being a private and at the time he was a sergeant. on the 87th day he returned because farming in mississippi was just too hard and love to the army life and he missed it. so, he decided since he was going to make it a career he was going to do more than learn as much as he possibly could. so at 28 years old to cut off age for becoming an officer, he applied for officer
lifted from the mississippi delta, 1930s, you know, who lived there? well, as i was driving, you looked closer, there was puffs of smoke coming from the roof. it was not someone who lived there. someone was still living here in the year 2002, 2003. one day, myself and matt black, a photographer who, you know, is kind of a modern day dorothy lang, evans, we pulledded off the side of the road, came over the railroad tracks across this little dirt road here, across from this vineyard, and we pulled up to the shack. it was in better shape then, but a tarp paper shack, and as we walked up, there were rabbit furs that had been -- that were hammered on to the wall. i remember knocking once, twice, and this place was on stilts. the door creeked open, and there stood this black man who looked like he'd been lifted from the mississippi delta, 1930s. he had a stutter. in fact, later he told us that he came west with a stutter, one state at a time. his name was james dixon, 95, he was living here and had since the 40s. he was part of the migration of blacks who did something that no blacks in ameri
them. some of them had to be cut on the bottom by hand. such is life on the mississippi, on -- what is the date on that? i can't read it. 1875. this book isn't that old. it's from the 20's or the 30's. i have the complete set of that edition. that is part of what got me by ian all these other books because when i found this set there were six or eight volumes missing. when i finally found out which ones were missing, i was on my way to becoming a full-fledged collector. so i finally collected all of those volumes for this particular set so it's complete. and in the meantime, i also collected several other complete sets like the one on the top which is basically the same books, they are just from a different publisher. then the ones in the middle with the yellow dust covers those are from the mark twain project in berkeley. they had been putting out scholarly editions for many years. and i have all of those. then on this wall over here are books about mark twain. also my 1601 collection this year. i'm not sure that it's appropriate for mixed company but there was a little racy story
and his work has been cited by the supreme court. his writing is cited as an excerpt of the mississippi seizing supreme court and has had a direct impact. mark lomax is effective after the national technical association data previously worked in liberia west africa is a program manager for the united nations overseeing the liberian police and emergency response unit and a police response unit. he is also served as director for the bureau of education beauty retired from the pennsylvania state police for 27 is a service and a graduate of the fbi national academy. with that i will turn things over to radley. >> thank you and thanks for cato for putting this on and thanks for mark and the nt 08 for agreeing to have a conversation with us today. i'm just going to jump right in. so, right around thanksgiving in 2006 a narcotics task force in the atlanta police department was out on patrol i guess and they saw someone walking alongside the road that guy that they had previously arrested for various drug offenses. they jumped out on him through him to the ground pulled a gun on him and a week
as "operation plunder dome" and plead by an fbi agent named dennis who was originally from mississippi. and he lead the investigation that ultimately resulted in buddy's conviction. after a trial people said you'll never be able to convict buddy. in a city buddy went to prison with 67% of the voters thinking he did a good job even though they thought he was guilty. when he was sentenced, the judge talked about how he was two people. he was dr. jekyll and mr. hyde app and buddy said privately to a friend later, how come i didn't get two fing paycheck. what he was kicked of racketeering and conspiracy being kind of knowing about it but not actually being physically involved in the underlying act. and buddy kind of framed it as what did i do and i was convicted of being the mayor. some of the jurors i spoke to felt otherwise that he was a guy who knew how to keep himself insulated like a mob boss he once prosecuted, ironically. and that was able to stay out of the direct line, but that he knew everything that was going on. he was the kind of guy one juror told me who know how many rolls of toilet
mississippi. but when it was published in 61864 the country was at war with the south and then two years later appearing in to the title history of the plots and crime. >> to overthrow liberty people were still reeling from the assassination of abraham lincoln and that feels like a conspiracy movie in the '70s received respectful though this is a the your time san "chicago tribune" and the papers praised philadelphia philadelphia, harrisburg, and a pennsylvania even the democratic papered claimed it the most powerful book of the century. and then in them with the letters to warn him all and then one issa this since this started 2.0 he said you be careful of this food you eat and drink can what you take and it was also said to lincoln i have heard it was the undoubted fact that the last two weeks general's harrison and taylor came to their end of what was administered in their plates at the white house. after lincoln died two prominent ministers of detroit in connecticut it were the supposes murders of harrison and taylor and other alleged their assassination for the new york ledger but added s
jersey, albany, new york, alexandria, virginia, and as far south as carolina and mississippi, and as far west as kentucky. more specialized knowledge association devoted to manufacturers, improvements in agriculture, the study of natural history. there was even a military philosophy society founded at west point. these all of your as well. these groups were invariably local or regional in scope and if you look at the names, they almost always have at least a town or city a solution within and often a province. it was very specific to the early precursor to the american philosophical society with a number of names that include something like the philosophical society of the society for advancement of useful knowledge or practical knowledge held in philadelphia in the province of pennsylvania. and from our perspective when you read this, it is sort of silly but it's important to understand in 18th century thinking, knowledge and its pursuit was a personal face-to-face experience. it had to be done locally. had to be done through face-to-face, through lectures. you have to have members need
out dirt farmers all over the midwest and the mississippi valley handing them one-way tickets to the vehicle city as flint nicknamed itself. the newcomers slept in shacks, tents and railroad cars. earl's family rented a tiny house, all he could afford on his factory pay. after the war earl tried farming again, failed again and returned to flint for good. everett grew up a city boy with no agricultural ambitions. after graduating from high school in 1933, he enlisted in general motors as an apprentice tool and dye maker at 50 cents an hour. the job could disappear in a day. if a supervisor wanted to hire his brother-in-law, he created ap opening by handing a worker a yellow slip, the color of termination. bachelors were laid off while married men with lower seniority kept their jobs. the supervision, they had no control either, everett recalled. you could come in today and have a desk and have a yellow slip on there that said you're all done. on november 12th, three welders conducted a short pro-union sit-down demonstration. in protest, a department in the plant stopped working
but a few structures of the mississippi river valley and the reoccupied western tennessee. in the east ready lee led his ragtag confederate forces, the army of northern virginia to one victory after another of their opposite number. but the victories were all one on virginia soil. and in feeble, the virginia economy even as they defend it. he knew better than any southerner that the confederacy's resources or to limited to keep fending off the confederacy's enemies in definitely. only by carrying the war into the union states and only by leveraging of war weariness public into peace negotiations can the confederacy hope to win. but this was by no means a far fetched up. in the fall of 1862 dissension over president abraham lincoln's emancipation proclamation had cost unhappy voters in new york and new jersey to install democratic governors they're come a new round of anti-war democratic candidates to were due to run in the fall of 1863 governors' elections in ohio and pennsylvania. if those states also turned against the war they could force of abraham lincoln either to begin peace talks or
on the mississippi, which was not quite as good as what mark twain portrayed in his book, but after doing that for a year, he teamed up with another american of german dissent named ben mast, and together they went to work in a flour mill in st. louis, and they did that for about a year; then they moved to illinois where they worked on a farm for three years, and in 185 p -- 1853 after hearing the great stories about the gold rush in california, they decided to make the move west, and they did this by buying 200 head of livestock driving them from st. louis to california, and turns out that could be a profitable venture things even back then were more expensive in california than they were in st. louis. you could buy a cow or ox for five or ten dollars in st. louis, and the same animal cost $50 or more in california. it was a profitable trip for them. they arrived in dayton, nevada in 1853, and they immediately went to work panning for gold in the carson river the next day. they did this for about three years working gold, operating a sleuth box for mixed results. some days very profitabl
, where did that come from? before he came to nevada territory, he worked on the mississippi river, and he became a steam boat captain. and the term mark twain is two fathoms. okay, deep. they would plum the water and so for the draft of the steam boat they would say mark twain. well, he liked that, apparently, when he came here. this is the story that's generally accepted. there's another story about him having a tab at the bar, and if he had someone with him, he'd say mark twain, mark two, put it on my tab. i think they do that in virginia city for tourists. but i think the generally accepted point of view is from being a steam boat captain. so here he is, he's writing for the territorial enterprise, first time he puts mark twain, and it's published february 3rd of 1863. from then on he is mark twain. and his stock would grow as his stories would be picked up. it wouldn't be just in virginia city. a newspaper in aurora would pick it up, newspapers in sacramento would pick it up, newspapers in san francisco. mostly in the western united states through the use of the telegraph. and he's ve
parts of the mississippi belt. it is about flea increasing literacy rates basically eliminating gender disparity in educational aspects and one fact of the progress is almost completely unappreciated in the last is the way that access to higher education includes a status iranian women. especially that westerners would consider this unacceptable in their own societies and the majority of universities are now female. the majority of them are now female. and women's presence is now felt across many disciplines. notwithstanding, we had this with no direct connection on the ground and a cadre of so-called iran experts, many of whom are ex-patriots were iranian americans will flood the revolution in don't see the islamic public. they continue to misinterpret the iranian politics. telling us that the system is on the verge of collapse. we will continue to lose ground in the middle east. and a good example in 2009 we will have an office of wishful thinking on the green movement that emerged out of this campaign, it is solving america's strategic problem for the middle east. they did so even t
of emmett till and he is talking about the deaths of two other organizers in mississippi who would try to register to vote and have been killed and she is angry and she is sad and she is despairing because she came to that night having spent more than a decade organizing around cases like this and what was particularly sort of exciting about this case was there have been enough organizing and enough awareness that there had been a trial and yet still the two killers go free. and i wanted to start there because i think many people would have made the comparison between the lynching of emmett till and trayvon martin, but i think we can go deeper in that comparison and to think about that comparison not just as a comparison of sadness and of anger but of what follows. because i know all of you know what's going to happen four days later on december 1, 1955 and that is rosa parks who has spent two decades organizing. she begins her adult political life around around the scottsboro case in spent the past decade turning it into a more activist branch and so she comes to december 1, 1955 with
martin is the 14-year-old black belt that was assassinated in the middle of mississippi in 1985 for allegedly violating racial etiquette and speaking to a white woman. his body was placed in the tallahassee river with a 125 lb coffin jindal tied around his neck. it was shown in the jet magazine and that spurred the nation to look at the price of white supremacy on our dhaka see. we think about 1963, 1963 is the year of birmingham and the year dr. king writes his famous letter from the jail. dr. king says the activism that has gone on the end of the young women and men in that are being addressed it sometimes as eight, naim, 10-years-old are taking the nation back to the democracy that was dug deep by the founding fathers. he was being too kind because the country was founded on racial slavery and it is a conversation that we still have not had. about 50 years ago with the march on washington provided a litmus test for democracy. when he speaks of the march on washington she says americans of all cultures and races have to struggle together and go to jail together to try to funda
of the mississippi, 800 square miles right here in the middle of california. these cotton growers from the south were chased out by the bull weasel, came last and they claim this land, this blakely and. they took the rivers and dams them and shoved to the flow to places where they wanted to go cotton. at some point they had to go find labor. a number of folks came to the basin and their nerd is played out here. quite okies, bitchiness and black okies. no one had ever written about lack okies. they came in the 40s when this cotton picker was started in the fields. it could take the middle swath of the fields in the 40s and 50s, but it could not take the edge of the rows. so the black okies were working across the machine that would eventually idle them, picking the edges of the cotton and in 10 years time they were idled. the women ended up becoming mates and housekeepers for wealthy white farmers, much like the south. and the men, where they occurred, found work. many of them were idled. the children left this place. when we came upon it, it was mostly old folks. when i wrote my last book, west of th
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26